Faculty & Staff

Faculty

Anna L. Ahlers

Visiting Professor

Teaching and Research Interests:

Anna L. Ahlers Visiting September, 2018 through June, 2019 Teaching and research interests: Anna L. Ahlers is associate professor at the University of Oslo (homepage [link: https://www.hf.uio.no/ikos/english/people/aca/chinese-and-korean-studies/tenured/annalah/index.html]). Trained in both political science and sinology, she combines these two disciplines in her study of Chinese politics, especially at the subnational level. In previous projects she has, for example, conducted in-depth research about community governance in Chinese villages, the local implementation of rural development and urbanization initiatives, and the societal implications of China’s gigantic smog problem – and she is enthusiastically teaching about these subjects. While at UChicago, she will be drafting one new project about China’s growing ambitions to shape the international system of science, as well as one about concepts and forms of political inclusion and exclusion in China.

Changyuan Fan April 2018 through March 2019

Visiting Professor

Teaching and Research Interests:

I am interested in Chinese traditional philology. I have been researching on bibliography and edition and the history of printing since I joined in work. I also pay attention to the circulation and collection of ancient rare books.  My work would be writing bibliographical essays for the Chinese rare books conserved in East Asian Library, UC.


 

Visiting Scholars and Post-Doctoral Fellows

Marjorie Burge
Postdoctoral Researcher

Teaching and Research Interests:

Marjorie’s work focuses on the early writing and literature of Japan and Korea in the sixth through eighth centuries. Her dissertation, titled “Inscriptive Practice and Sinographic Literary Culture in Early Historic Korea and Japan,” was completed in 2018 and highlights archaeologically excavated wooden documents known as mokkan alongside extant documentary sources to understand how early written culture developed in the Korean kingdoms of Paekche and Silla and seventh/eighth century Japan. Marjorie has also worked extensively on premodern poetic forms of both Japan and Korea, especially the waka of Man’yōshū and Silla hyangga. As an extension of her dissertation research, while at the University of Chicago Marjorie hopes to pursue research on specific types of orthographic practice employed in the transcription of literary works in eighth century Japan and Korea.