Courses

CHIN 10100 Elementary Modern Chinese I

Must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted. This three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of Spring Quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. In Spring Quarter, students are required to submit a video project for the Chinese Video Project Award. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week. A drill session with the TA is held one hour a week in addition to scheduled class time.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

KORE 10100 Introduction to the Korean Language I

This introductory course is designed to provide a basic foundation in modern Korean language and culture by focusing on the balanced development of the four basic language skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Students in KORE 10100 begin by learning the complete Korean writing system (Hangul), which is followed by lessons focusing on basic conversational skills and grammatical structures. To provide sufficient opportunities to apply what has been learned in class, there are small group drill sessions, weekly Korean television drama screenings, and a number of other cultural activities (e.g., Korean New Year's game competitions). The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week.

Prerequisites

Must be taken for a quality grade.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

JAPN 10100 Elementary Modern Japanese I

This is the first year of a four-year program, which is intended to provide students with a thorough grounding in modern Japanese. Students will learn grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading and writing. By the end of 10300, the students will be able to survive in Japan by communicating with native speakers to ask and respond to simple questions about predictable, familiar topics related to daily activities. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions each week.

Prerequisites

All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted. 

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

KORE 10200 Introduction to the Korean Language II

This introductory course is designed to provide a basic foundation in modern Korean language and culture by focusing on the balanced development of the four basic language skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Students in KORE 10100 begin by learning the complete Korean writing system (Hangul), which is followed by lessons focusing on basic conversational skills and grammatical structures. To provide sufficient opportunities to apply what has been learned in class, there are small group drill sessions, weekly Korean television drama screenings, and a number of other cultural activities (e.g., Korean New Year's game competitions). The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week.

Prerequisites

10100 or placement. Must be taken for a quality grade.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

JAPN 10200 Elementary Modern Japanese II

This is the first year of a four-year program, which is intended to provide students with a thorough grounding in modern Japanese. Students will learn grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading and writing. By the end of 10300, the students will be able to survive in Japan by communicating with native speakers to ask and respond to simple questions about predictable, familiar topics related to daily activities. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions each week.

Prerequisites

JAPN 10100 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted. 

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

CHIN 10200 Elementary Modern Chinese II

This three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of Spring Quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. In Spring Quarter, students are required to submit a video project for the Chinese Video Project Award. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week. A drill session with the TA is held one hour a week in addition to scheduled class time.

Prerequisites

CHIN 10100 or placement. Must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

CHIN 10300 Elementary Modern Chinese III

This three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of Spring Quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. In Spring Quarter, students are required to submit a video project for the Chinese Video Project Award. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week. A drill session with the TA is held one hour a week in addition to scheduled class time.

Prerequisites

CHIN 10200 or placement. Must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

KORE 10300 Introduction to the Korean Language III

This introductory course is designed to provide a basic foundation in modern Korean language and culture by focusing on the balanced development of the four basic language skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Students in KORE 10100 begin by learning the complete Korean writing system (Hangul), which is followed by lessons focusing on basic conversational skills and grammatical structures. To provide sufficient opportunities to apply what has been learned in class, there are small group drill sessions, weekly Korean television drama screenings, and a number of other cultural activities (e.g., Korean New Year's game competitions). The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week.

Prerequisites

10200 or placement. Must be taken for a quality grade.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

JAPN 10300 Elementary Modern Japanese III

This is the first year of a four-year program, which is intended to provide students with a thorough grounding in modern Japanese. Students will learn grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary through speaking, listening, reading and writing. By the end of 10300, the students will be able to survive in Japan by communicating with native speakers to ask and respond to simple questions about predictable, familiar topics related to daily activities. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions each week.

Prerequisites

JAPN 10200 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted. 

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

EALC 10510 Topics in EALC: Approaches to East Asian Popular Music

This course surveys a variety of scholarly approaches to the study of popular music in East Asia since 1900, including questions of authenticity, gender, media technologies, circulation, and translation. The course will introduce a variety of musical genres from China, Japan, Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan, ranging from forms considered 'traditional' to contemporary idol and hiphop music. All readings will be available in English, and no background in music is required or expected

2020-2021 Winter

EALC 10600 Topics in EALC: Ghosts and the Fantastic in Literature & Film

(CMST 24603, SIGN 26006)

What is a ghost? How and why are ghosts represented in particular forms in a particular culture at particular historical moments and how do these change as stories travel between cultures? How and why is traditional ghost lore reconfigured in the contemporary world? This course will explore the complex meanings, both literal and figurative, of ghosts and the fantastic in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean tales, plays, and films. Issues to be explored include: 1) the relationship between the supernatural, gender, and sexuality; 2) the confrontation of death and mortality; 3) collective anxieties over the loss of the historical past; 4) and the visualization of the invisible through art, theater, and cinema.

2020-2021 Spring

EALC 10602 Topics in EALC: Past, Present, & Future of the Novel

This course will introduce students to the study of literature in modern East Asia. In particular, it examines the evolution of the novel in Japan, China, and Korea as a form of imaginative writing. We will examine major canonical works from each country: three from the early 20th century; three from mid-century; and three from the early 21st century. How did the novel form develop in East Asia relative to other parts of the world? How has it responded to the shifting geo-political and economic positions of Japan, China, and Korea? How has it attempted to represent social and cultural conflict? Authors to be read include Natsume Soseki, Lu Xun, Xiao Hong, Han Kang, Tawada Yoko, and Cixin Liu. All works will be read in English translation. 

2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 10711 Topics in EALC: Mother Tongues – Language in East Asian Literature and Film

What does it mean to write as a native speaker? How do we hear in our mother tongue? It is often said that people have a natural affinity with their native language, one which allows creators to more freely and wholly express their thoughts and experiences, and which allows audiences to understand the full nuances of a work. But there are also many who do not have a straightforward relationship with a native language. For instance, colonized writers who are forced to write in a language that is not their own, films which depict people in multilingual environments, writers who can speak but not write in their first language. This course surveys literary and artistic works from China, Japan, and Korea that mourn, celebrate, and push the boundaries and potentials of language. Through the analysis of these works, we will explore the ways in which language relates to larger social, political, and cultural contexts including ethnic minorities, diaspora, gender, technology, and more. All works will be provided in English translation.

2020-2021 Autumn

CHIN 11100 First-Year Chinese for Heritage Students I

Consultation with instruction encouraged prior to enrollment. Must be taken for a quality grade. This three-quarter series is intended for heritage speakers of Chinese. Our objectives include teaching students standard pronunciation and basic skills in reading and writing, while broadening their communication skills for a wider range of contexts and functions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

CHIN 11200 First-Year Chinese for Heritage Students II

This three-quarter series is intended for heritage speakers of Chinese. Our objectives include teaching students standard pronunciation and basic skills in reading and writing, while broadening their communication skills for a wider range of contexts and functions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

Prerequisites

Consultation with instruction encouraged prior to enrollment. Must be taken for a quality grade.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

CHIN 11300 First-Year Chinese for Heritage Students III

This three-quarter series is intended for heritage speakers of Chinese. Our objectives include teaching students standard pronunciation and basic skills in reading and writing, while broadening their communication skills for a wider range of contexts and functions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

Prerequisites

Consultation with instruction encouraged prior to enrollment. Must be taken for a quality grade.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

EALC 14302 Modern Korean History

(GLST 14302, HIST 14302)

This course focuses on the modern history of a country that is well known for shifting its course at dizzying speed. Beginning with the last monarchic dynasty's "opening" to the world in the late nineteenth century, the course will move on to deal with radical transformations such as Japanese colonization and Korea's subsequent liberation in 1945; the civil war, national division, dictatorship in two Koreas; and the economic miracle and democratization in the South and nuclear development in the North. How do we understand recent events like the South Korean president's impeachment in 2017 and the North Korean leader's high-profile diplomatic détentes in 2018? Do they come out of nowhere, or can we find an underlying consistency based on an understanding of the long twentieth century? Through a careful study of Korea's modern history, this course is designed to reveal the longer trajectories of Korea's historical development, showing how the study of this contentious peninsula becomes a study of modern world history.

J. Jeon
2020-2021 Winter

CHIN 20100 Intermediate Modern Chinese I

Must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted. Two sections. The goal of this sequence is to enhance students' reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

Prerequisites

CHIN 10300 or placement.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

KORE 20100 Intermediate Korean I

As a continuation of KORE 10100-10200-10300, this course is intended to continue to build on students' language skills with an emphasis on enhancing the speaking ability, presentational skills, composition writing skills, and usage of more complex constructions. Approximately 150 Chinese characters are introduced for the achievement of basic literacy and vocabulary expansion. The curriculum also includes media, authentic reading materials, and weekly Korean language table meetings to maximize cultural exposure and opportunities to apply Korean language skills in real life situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week.

Prerequisites

KORE 10300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a quality grade.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

JAPN 20100 Intermediate Modern Japanese I

JAPN 20100 continues to work on building a solid foundation for basic Japanese language skills while preparing students to progress to an Intermediate level. The emphasis on the spoken language gradually shifts toward reading and writing in JAPN 20200 and 20300, but spoken Japanese continues to be enriched throughout the sequence. Students at this level will be able to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks in straightforward social situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions each week, conducted mostly in Japanese.

Prerequisites

JAPN 10300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

KORE 20200 Intermediate Korean II

As a continuation of KORE 10100-10200-10300, this course is intended to continue to build on students' language skills with an emphasis on enhancing the speaking ability, presentational skills, composition writing skills, and usage of more complex constructions. Approximately 150 Chinese characters are introduced for the achievement of basic literacy and vocabulary expansion. The curriculum also includes media, authentic reading materials, and weekly Korean language table meetings to maximize cultural exposure and opportunities to apply Korean language skills in real life situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week.

Prerequisites

KORE 20100 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a quality grade.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

JAPN 20200 Intermediate Modern Japanese II

JAPN 20100 continues to work on building a solid foundation for basic Japanese language skills while preparing students to progress to an Intermediate level. The emphasis on the spoken language gradually shifts toward reading and writing in JAPN 20200 and 20300, but spoken Japanese continues to be enriched throughout the sequence. Students at this level will be able to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks in straightforward social situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions each week, conducted mostly in Japanese.

Prerequisites

JAPN 20100 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

CHIN 20200 Intermediate Modern Chinese II

The goal of this sequence is to enhance students' reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

Prerequisites

CHIN 20100 or placement. Must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

KORE 20300 Intermediate Korean III

As a continuation of KORE 10100-10200-10300, this course is intended to continue to build on students' language skills with an emphasis on enhancing the speaking ability, presentational skills, composition writing skills, and usage of more complex constructions. Approximately 150 Chinese characters are introduced for the achievement of basic literacy and vocabulary expansion. The curriculum also includes media, authentic reading materials, and weekly Korean language table meetings to maximize cultural exposure and opportunities to apply Korean language skills in real life situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week.

Prerequisites

KORE 20200 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a quality grade.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

CHIN 20300 Intermediate Modern Chinese III

The goal of this sequence is to enhance students' reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

Prerequisites

CHIN 20200 or placement. Must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

JAPN 20300 Intermediate Modern Japanese III

JAPN 20100 continues to work on building a solid foundation for basic Japanese language skills while preparing students to progress to an Intermediate level. The emphasis on the spoken language gradually shifts toward reading and writing in JAPN 20200 and 20300, but spoken Japanese continues to be enriched throughout the sequence. Students at this level will be able to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks in straightforward social situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions each week, conducted mostly in Japanese.

Prerequisites

JAPN 20200 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

CHIN 20403 Advance Modern Chinese III

The goal of this sequence is to help students develop advanced proficiency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing. This sequence emphasizes more advanced grammatical structures. We begin with discussion in Chinese on topics relevant to modern China and then shift to authentic Chinese texts in an effort to better prepare students to deal with original Chinese source materials. Discussion in Chinese required. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

Prerequisites

CHIN 20402 or placement.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

CHIN 20800 Elementary Literary Chinese I

Must be taken for a quality grade. This course introduces the basic grammar of the written Chinese language from the time of the Confucian Analects to the literary movements at the beginning of the twentieth century. Students read original texts of genres that include philosophy, memorials, and historical narratives.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

CHIN 20900 Elementary Literary Chinese II

This course introduces the basic grammar of the written Chinese language from the time of the Confucian Analects to the literary movements at the beginning of the twentieth century. Students read original texts of genres that include philosophy, memorials, and historical narratives. Spring Quarter is devoted exclusively to reading poetry. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week.

Prerequisites

CHIN 20800 or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a quality grade.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

JAPN 21200 Intermediate Modern Japanese through Japanimation I

This course focuses on learning spoken Japanese through full-length Japanese animated films. To ensure balance in learning, writing and reading materials are also provided. Students at this level are able to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks in straightforward social situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions each week.

Prerequisites

JAPN 20100 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

JAPN 21300 Intermediate Modern Japanese through Japanimation II

This course focuses on learning spoken Japanese through full-length Japanese animated films. To ensure balance in learning, writing and reading materials are also provided. Students at this level are able to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks in straightforward social situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions each week.

Prerequisites

JAPN 21200 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

CHIN 22110 Second-Year Chinese for Heritage Students I

This three-quarter sequence is intended for bilingual/heritage speakers of Mandarin Chinese. Paralleled with the Intermediate sequence for non-heritage speakers, the goal of this sequence is to further develop students’ reading, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics in personal settings and some academic or professional settings. Upon completing this sequence, students are expected to pass the Practical Proficiency Test to earn a certificate on their transcript. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

Prerequisites

CHIN 11300 or placement of 20100. Students must take a quality a grade. No auditors permitted.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

CHIN 22120 Second-Year Chinese for Heritage Students II

This three-quarter sequence is intended for bilingual/heritage speakers of Mandarin Chinese. Paralleled with the Intermediate sequence for non-heritage speakers (CHIN 20100-20200-20300), the goal of this sequence is to further develop students’ reading, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics in personal settings and some academic or professional settings, to train students’ ability to describe items, to narrate events, and to discuss and defend opinions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

Prerequisites

CHIN 22110 or placement. Students must take a quality grade.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

CHIN 22130 Second-Year Chinese for Heritage Students III

This three-quarter sequence is intended for heritage speakers of Mandarin Chinese. Paralleled with the Intermediate sequence for non-heritage speakers (CHIN 20100-20200-20300), the goal of this sequence is to further develop students’ reading, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics in personal settings and some academic or professional settings, to train students’ ability to describe items, to narrate events, and to discuss and defend opinions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

Prerequisites

CHIN 22120 or placement. Students must take a quality grade.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

CHIN 23110 Third-Year Chinese for Heritage Students I

This three-quarter series are intended for bilingual speakers of Chinese who already have intermediate level ability to understand and speak mandarin Chinese in daily communication, although they may have some accent or some difficulty using the language in formal settings. While all the communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing will be trained in CHIN23110, the emphasis will be on standard Mandarin pronunciation, discourse level discussion on topics about modern China , and advanced reading and writing. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

CHIN 23120 Third-Year Chinese for Heritage Students II

This three-quarter series are intended for heritage speakers of Chinese who already have intermediate level ability to understand and speak mandarin Chinese in daily communication, although they may have some accent or some difficulty using the language in formal settings. While all the communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing will be trained in CHIN 23100, the emphasis will be on standard Mandarin pronunciation, discourse level discussion on topics about modern China, and advanced reading and writing. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

Prerequisites

CHIN 23110 or placement.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

CHIN 23130 Third-Year Chinese for Heritage Students III

This three-quarter series are intended for heritage speakers of Chinese who already have intermediate level ability to understand and speak mandarin Chinese in daily communication, although they may have some accent or some difficulty using the language in formal settings. While all the communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing will be trained in CHIN 23100, the emphasis will be on standard Mandarin pronunciation, discourse level discussion on topics about modern China, and advanced reading and writing. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

Prerequisites

CHIN 23120 or placement.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

EALC 23216 Cold War, Religion and Religious Freedom in East Asia

(HMRT 23216)

“Religious freedom” is enshrined in not only liberal democratic constitutions but also in constitutions of socialist nation-states such as North Korea, although the latter are frequently dismissed by the West as veneers of democracy. The concept of “religious freedom” has been used by the West (i.e. United States) to categorize the world into “modern” and “anti-modern,” “free” and “communist” throughout the Cold War. Yet, how did “religion” emerge as a category in East Asia? What did “religious freedom” mean in the context of occupations, divisions and hot/cold war? How was religion managed by states, and how did religious communities negotiate with local and global political currents? By pivoting to East Asia as a privileged site of analysis, this course will interrogate the notions of “religion” and “religious freedom” as they were articulated and mobilized for various motives. Core areas of analysis will include the relationship between religion and state-building, religion and human rights, and religion and empire. Moreover, this course decouples the temporal qualifier “Cold War” from “East Asia” to challenge conventional demarcations of the Cold War (1945-1991), for its “end” is still a contested discussion.

S. Park
2020-2021 Spring

EALC 23903 Ethics, Nature, Dao

Some worldviews assert that human beings exist somehow apart from the natural world. Humans are to have dominion over it, for example, or to transcend it entirely. In many works of traditional Chinese religion, philosophy, and art, however, we find something quite different, a picture in which the human being is seamlessly of the world. The cosmos is at play within her, Daoist traditions teach; Chinese landscape paintings were at times understood to depict a world in which rivers, trees, and humans alike follow cosmic patterns; the great Song Dynasty poet Su Shi, in a line beloved of later Chan and Zen Buddhist writers, wrote that “the sounds of valleys are [the Buddha’s] long broad tongue.” These worldviews are not ecological, precisely—ecology is a modern science, not a traditional ethos—but works of Chinese philosophy and art that evince them offer profound resources for thinking in the mode known now as the environmental humanities. We will explore our works as resources for thinking in our age of climate crisis—at least in part. We will also read them, and stay true to them, as works of traditional Chinese art and thought.

2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 23970 Histories of Chinese Dance

This class is an introduction to the forms, practices, and meanings of dance in China and the diaspora from ancient times to the present day. Through readings, videos, class demonstrations, and performances, we will explore the reconstruction of court dance in early China; Central Asian dance and dancers in the medieval imagination; the development of operatic movement in the late imperial period; the introduction and transformation of concert dance in the first half of the 20th century; socialist dance and the model ballets of the Cultural Revolution; folk dance and PRC ethno-nationalist discourse; the post-reform transnational avant-garde; ballroom dancing and everyday urban street life; Han revivalism, Shen Yun, and “classical Chinese dance” in the 21st century. Across these varied materials we will ask: what do we mean when we speak of dance, and what makes a dance Chinese? All materials in English; no background required.

2020-2021 Spring

EALC 24214 Cities in Modern China: History and Historiography

China's shift from a predominantly rural country to an urban majority is one of the greatest social and demographic transformations in world history. This course begins with the roots of this story in the early modern history of China's cities and traces it through a series of momentous upheavals in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will learn about how global ideas and practices contributed to efforts to make Chinese cities "modern," but also how urban experiences have been integral to the meaning of modernity itself. We will discuss urban space, administration, public health, commerce and industry, transportation, foreign relations, and material culture. In addition to tackling these important topics in urban history and tracing the general development of Chinese cities over time, another primary concern of our course will be the place of urban history in English-language scholarship on Chinese history more broadly. We will track this development from Max Weber's observations on Chinese cities through the rise of "China-centered" scholarship in the 1970s through the "global turn" of the 2000s. During the course students will develop the skills necessary for writing an effective historiography paper, i.e., doing background research, writing annotated bibliographies, and using citation management software. Students will put these skills to work by writing a critical historiographical review of scholarship on a topic of their choice.

D. Knorr
2020-2021 Spring

EALC 24256 Everyday Maoism: Revolution, Daily Life, and Material Culture in Socialist China

(HIST 24512, SIGN 26046)

The history of Maoist China is usually told as a sequence of political campaigns, from land reform to the Cultural Revolution. Yet for the majority of the Chinese population, the promise of socialism was as much about material transformations as it was about political change: a socialist revolution would bring better living conditions, new work regimes and new consumption patterns. If we want to understand what socialism meant for different groups of people, we have to look at the "new objects" of socialist modernity, at changes in dress codes and apartment layouts, at electrification and city planning – or at the persistence of an older material life under a new socialist veneer. In this course, we will analyze workplaces in order to understand how socialism changed the way people worked, and look at rationing and consumption in the households to see how socialism affected them at home. We will look at how specific objects came to stand in for the Maoist revolution, for socialist modernity, or for feudal backwardness. The course has a strong comparative dimension: we will read some of the literature on socialism in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, to see how Chinese socialism differed from its cousins. Another aim is methodological. How can we understand the lives of people who wrote little and were rarely written about? To which extent can we read people's life experiences out of the material record of their lives?

2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 24506 Disability in East Asia, Past and Present

(HMRT 24506)

Why does disability matter to East Asia? This course uses this overarching question to anchor discussions on the role disability plays in historical and contemporary issues of social inequality and human rights in China, Japan and Korea. Students will think critically about disability identities, institutions, theories, experiences, and interactions that have made disability what it is today. We will learn to narrate disability from a wide range of sources that represent bodily impairments (blindness, madness, autism, trauma, deformities etc.) in medicine, literature and film, and to relate disability narratives to theoretical debates over stigma, medicalization, the politics of inclusion and exclusion, and human rights. We will also to look more closely into the lives of “disabled persons”—who they are, how they are disabled and by what circumstances, how they identify themselves and are represented in different media. More broadly, this course unsettles the concept of East Asia by making sense of disability as “difference” and to think about how it may expand our “mainstream” assumptions of body, culture and society.

A. Wang
2020-2021 Spring

EALC 24508 Human Rights in Japanese History K. Pan

(HIST 24508)

This course examines how the modern concept of "rights" and "human rights" localized in Japan and how different parties in Japan have used the language of human rights in attempts to remake Japan's social, cultural, and legal landscape. We will explore a wide range of topics including the translation of Eurocentric rights talk in East Asia, colonization and decolonization, statelessness and migration, transitional justice and reconciliation, biopolitical rights and bio-citizenship, indigenous rights, and women and gender-specific rights. Throughout the course we pay special attention to the ways in which rights talk and human-rights politics in Japan intertwine with the country's efforts to modernize and build the "nation within the empire" and, after its defeat in WWII, to close off its "long postwar" and reconcile with its neighbors. This is an introductory course, and no previous knowledge of Japanese history or the international history of human rights is required. However, you should be prepared to read (and watch, browse, and listen to) a wide array of primary and secondary sources that destabilize the most common vocabulary and concepts we take for granted in contemporary human-rights talk such as race, state responsibility, and the very notion of universalism so central to the idea of human rights.

K. Pan
2020-2021 Winter

EALC 24916 Yōkai Media

(CMST 24916)

This course centers on yōkai (monsters or fantastic creatures) and theories of the fantastic in cinema and media. Historically, it spans the range from medieval emaki and Edo chōnin culture through 20th and 21st century manga and anime. Inquiry into yōkai and the fantastic is intended to develop new strategies for putting cinema and media into dialogue with theories of political sovereignty and capitalism in the context of everyday life and its urban myths.

T. Lamarre
2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 25025 The Real and the Fake in Early Modern China

This class explores the late imperial fascination with the boundaries between reality and illusion, genuine and counterfeit, self and role. Focusing on the period from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century—a period marked by both tremendous commercial growth and devastating political turmoil—we will trace the development of a discourse that at once imposes and seeks to overcome these categories of real and fake. In addition to readings from drama, fiction, and poetry, materials will include manuals on forgeries and scams, dream encyclopedias, designs for imaginary gardens, and guidebooks to fantastical realms. All readings available in English, but students with Chinese reading ability will be encouraged to read the original texts.

2020-2021 Spring

EALC 25200 Early Daoist Texts

(FNDL 25200)

In this course, we will focus primarily on reading (in English) the Laozi and Zhuangzi, paying attention both to philosophical and historical issues. We'll also read several ancillary texts, such as the "Nei ye" chapter of the Guanzi and the "Yu Lao" and Jie Lao" chapter of the Han Feizi, as well as such unearthed manuscripts as the Tai Yi sheng shui and Heng xian. In all cases, we will be concerned first of all with what these texts may have meant to people in the Warring States period, and then only incidentally with how they have been understood in subsequent periods and places.

2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 25301 Inventing the Chinese Short Story

This class will trace the emergence of the vernacular short story as a new genre in the late Ming and early Qing. We will focus on the seveteenth-century story collections of Feng Menglong, Ling Mengchu, Aina Jushi, and Li Yu, whose stories map the social whole of late imperial China—from merchant schemes to courtesan romances, from the friendships of students to the follies of emperors. Alongside close readings of selected stories, we will examine the structure, sources, and publication histories of these collections and locate them in a broader discussion of the meanings and functions of vernacular literature. All readings in English.

2020-2021 Winter

EALC 25620 Japanese Animation: The Making of a Global Media

(CMST 25620)

This course offers an introduction to Japanese animation, from its origins in the 1910s to its emergence as global culture in the 1990s. The goal is not only to provide insight into Japanese animation within the context of Japan but also to consider those factors that have transformed it into a global cultural form with a diverse, worldwide fanbase. As such, the course approaches Japanese animation from three distinct perspectives on Japanese animation, which are designed to introduce students to three important methodological approaches to contemporary media — film studies, media studies, and fan studies or cultural studies. As we look at Japanese animation in light of these different conceptual frameworks, we will also consider how its transnational dissemination and ‘Asianization’ challenge some of our basic assumptions about global culture, which have been shaped primarily through the lens of Americanization.

T. Lamarre
2020-2021 Winter

EALC 28150 Women and Work in 20th Century China

This course examines changes in the working lives of East Asian women from the late nineteenth to the 21st century. Most of the readings will be on China but we will also discuss Korea and Japan. All readings are in English. 

2020-2021 Spring

KORE 29000 Business Korean

This course aims to help students build an advanced-level speaking, vocabulary, and communication skills needed for a variety of Korean business settings. Students will become familiar with Korean business language and culture through classroom activities and homework assignments based on authentic materials. Topics will include searching for job opportunities related to Korea, composing CVs, preparing for job interviews and presentations, discussing business cases, and introducing current issues related to Korean economy and society.

Prerequisites

Successful completion of third year Korean or equivalent skills.

2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 29430 The Planned Economy: A Global History of Central Planning, from Bismarck to the Green New Deal

(GLST 29430, HIST 29430)

This course will change the way you think about politics. One of the most urgent political questions for any modern society is what economic activity to leave to private actors and what economic activity to place under state control. Today we hear much political debate over whether capitalism or socialism is superior, and what these terms mean. This debate can obscure the historical fact that many different ideological systems around the globe have experimented with highly centralized, state-directed economic organization. In what contexts have these experiments succeeded and failed? What counts as success and failure? To what extent has one experiment in central planning studied and/or learned from examples that preceded it? This course pursues these questions beginning with the origins of modern central planning in Prussia and later during World War I. It goes on to assess other experiments in central planning, including the New Deal, the Soviet Union and Maoist China; the Axis Powers of Italy, the Third Reich, and Imperial Japan; and later in the postcolonial global south from India to Ghana. The class ends by contemplating the Green New Deal and the role of central planning in the future of the United States.

M. Lowenstein
2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 29432 Cold War Cultures in Divided Korea and Germany, 1945–2000

(GLST 29432, GRMN 29432, HIST 29432)

This course introduces students to the history of the Cold War through the comparative study of its front lines: divided Korea and Germany. Germany and Korea shared little in common—culturally, geopolitically, and historically—before 1945. And yet for both nations, the end of the Second World War and the onset of the Cold War brought with it the near parallel division of their societies into two mutually antagonistic states, each allied with the opposing ideological camp. To what extent did the experience of division and marginality in the bifurcated world order give both Germanys and Koreas simultaneously unique and yet similar experiences of the conflict? To answer this question, we will examine how the Cold War shaped conflicts over culture, consumption, and power in all four states while following how each positioned themselves on the international stage vis-à-vis each other, the superpowers, and the "Third World." This course requires neither background knowledge of Korean or German languages, nor these regions' histories, nor previous coursework in history.

E. Pérez and B. Van Zee
2020-2021 Spring

EALC 29500 Senior Thesis Tutorial I

For this course students are required to obtain a “College Reading and Research Course Form” from their College adviser and have it signed both by their faculty reader and by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Two quarters of this sequence may count as one credit for the EALC major, and are required for any undergraduate writing a B.A. Honors Thesis in EALC. It is highly recommended that students take this sequence autumn and winter, but a spring quarter course is offered for unusual circumstances.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 29600 Senior Thesis Tutorial II

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

EALC 29700 Senior Thesis Tutorial III

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

CHIN 41000 Advanced Readings in Literary Chinese III

This quarter we will focus on reading selected tales from Liaozhai zhiyi 聊齋誌異, Pu Songling’s 蒲松齡seventeenth-century masterpiece, using Zhang Youhe’s 張友鶴variorum edition Liaozhai zhiyi huijiao huizhu huiping ben 聊齋誌異會校會注會評本alongside the nineteenth-century glossaries and pingdian 評點commentaries included. Problems to be addressed include how to deal with allusions (diangu) and engage with period/ individual style in literary Chinese.  We will work on not only understanding the meaning of the text but also on producing stage by stage polished English translations. This will culminate in a class anthology of our final translations. The course meets remotely Mon/Wed 11:30-12:50 PM.

E-versions of tales we select for translation in class will be available on canvas.

Prerequisites

Course may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Undergraduate enrollment is encouraged. CHIN 40900, or CHIN 21000, or placement, or consent of instructor. Note(s): Not offered every year; quarters vary.

2020-2021 Spring

CHIN 20601 Fifth-Year Modern Chinese I

Both undergraduate and graduate students can take this course. The goal of this course is to help learners get an in-depth knowledge on Chinese culture, society and history, to further develop students’ literary reading and writing skills in Chinese, and to help students master the skills of writing Chinese essays on a wide variety of topics. This course will use films and television shows as basic content. Analysis of cultural and literary texts will provide the basis for practice in discussion and writing. Chinese grammar patterns and sentence structures will be introduced. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week.

Prerequisites

CHIN 20503 or placement.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 20042/30042 Busan Biennale: The Chicago Chapter Seminar

(ARTV 20024, ARTV 30024)

Timed to coincide with the Busan Biennale's Chicago Chapter, a series of events and exchanges with artists and organizers of the project, this interdisciplinary class will examine the context of the biennale and respond to works in the show-- giving special attention to the interplay between sound, text, and image. Using Russian composer Modest Mussorgsky's Picture at an Exhibition as inspiration, artists, musicians, and writers from South Korea and around the world were invited to respond to both the city of Busan and to each other's work. Similarly, we will likewise read, listen, and look at the work and create projects while considering our own context here in the city of Chicago. Students will be asked to complete one short writing assignment, one short creative piece, and develop a larger project. Weekly reading assignments will be discussed, drawing mainly from the Biennale reader and other artist writings that will guide our thinking about artistic practice across mediums and the nexus of artistic writing and conceptual art more broadly. What kind of artworks will emerge from this encounter with an international biennale? What is the meaning of interdisciplinarity and experimental form when conventional forms of exhibition making that have been so upended by the pandemic? These are just a few of the questions that will guide our inquiry during the seminar.

Z. Cahill
2020-2021 Spring

CHIN 20401/30100 Advanced Modern Chinese I

The goal of this sequence is to help students develop advanced proficiency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing. This sequence emphasizes more advanced grammatical structures. We begin with discussion in Chinese on topics relevant to modern China and then shift to authentic Chinese texts in an effort to better prepare students to deal with original Chinese source materials. Discussion in Chinese required. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

Prerequisites

CHIN 20300 or placement.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

KORE 20401/30100 Advanced Korean I

This course introduces a wide selection of authentic reading materials from Korean newspaper articles, college-level textbooks, and literary prose as an entry point to discuss topics and issues in Korean society, culture, and history. The primary objective is further enhancement of advanced reading comprehension, composition writing, and presentational skills. In addition, Chinese character (Hanja) lessons are incorporated into each lesson with the purpose of expanding vocabulary to the advanced level. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week.

Prerequisites

KORE 20300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a quality grade.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

JAPN 20405/30100 Advanced Modern Japanese I

(JAPN 30100)

The goal is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease and to solidify the grammar, vocabulary and kanji foundation built during the students’ study at Elementary and Intermediate Modern Japanese levels. Students will expand their four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) as well as the socio-cultural knowledge they need for communication, thereby easing their transition into Advanced Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute sessions each week.

Prerequisites

JAPN 20300/21300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

KORE 20402/30200 Advanced Korean II

Must be taken for a quality grade. This course introduces a wide selection of authentic reading materials from Korean newspaper articles, college-level textbooks, and literary prose as an entry point to discuss topics and issues in Korean society, culture, and history. The primary objective is further enhancement of advanced reading comprehension, composition writing, and presentational skills. In addition, Chinese character (Hanja) lessons are incorporated into each lesson with the purpose of expanding vocabulary to the advanced level. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week.

Prerequisites

KORE 30100 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a quality grade.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

JAPN 20402/30200 Advanced Modern Japanese II

(JAPN 30200)

The goal is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease and to solidify the grammar, vocabulary and kanji foundation built during the students’ study at Elementary and Intermediate Modern Japanese levels. Students will expand their four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) as well as the socio-cultural knowledge they need for communication, thereby easing their transition into Advanced Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute sessions each week.

Prerequisites

JAPN 20401 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

CHIN 20402/30200 Advance Modern Chinese II

The goal of this sequence is to help students develop advanced proficiency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing. This sequence emphasizes more advanced grammatical structures. We begin with discussion in Chinese on topics relevant to modern China and then shift to authentic Chinese texts in an effort to better prepare students to deal with original Chinese source materials. Discussion in Chinese required. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

Prerequisites

CHIN 30100 or placement.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

JAPN 20403/30300 Advanced Modern Japanese III

The goal is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease and to solidify the grammar, vocabulary and kanji foundation built during the students’ study at Elementary and Intermediate Modern Japanese levels. Students will expand their four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) as well as the socio-cultural knowledge they need for communication, thereby easing their transition into Advanced Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute sessions each week.

Prerequisites

JAPN 20402 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

KORE 20403/30300 Advanced Korean III

This course introduces a wide selection of authentic reading materials from Korean newspaper articles, college-level textbooks, and literary prose as an entry point to discuss topics and issues in Korean society, culture, and history. The primary objective is further enhancement of advanced reading comprehension, composition writing, and presentational skills. In addition, Chinese character (Hanja) lessons are incorporated into each lesson with the purpose of expanding vocabulary to the advanced level. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week.

Prerequisites

KORE 30200 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a quality grade.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

EALC 21401/31401 The Cultural Biography of Things in China

This course investigates literary and visual strategies in China through which material objects are depicted and animated. Our emphasis will be on reading primary sources and viewing real objects (online) up through the 18th century,  but we’ll also incorporate approaches from anthropology, the history of material culture and technology, literary theory, and art history in a comparative context.  Genres to be covered include the ode on things, the it-biography, tales of the strange, the vernacular novel, handbooks for connoisseurs and collectors, paintings and illustrated books. Students will be guided throughout the term to produce a final research paper. This may take the form of a cultural biography of a real object or class of objects; it could be a study of how objects are depicted in fiction or drama, in painting or a specific site; it could investigate how objects are treated in the antiquarian scholarly tradition, or become a form of obsessive collecting; or how they work in religious worship, commerce, or global exchange, but there are many other possibilities. All readings will be available in English. Some previous background in Chinese literature, history, or art history would be helpful but is not required.

2020-2021 Winter

EALC 24117/34117 Aino/Ainu/Aynu: Reading Indigenous Tales in Japanese

(HIST 24117/34117)

The Aynu indigenous peoples of Japan have an extensive collection of oral tales that have been collected over the past century. In this course we will read and translate (from Japanese and Aynu originals) into English, various examples of Aynu oral literature. The selections range from everyday tales in the Uwepeker(Talking Tales) genre to the sacred songs of the Aynu Yukar.  Reading ability in Japanese is required.

Prerequisites

JAPN 20300 Intermediate Modern Japanese-3 (or equivalent)

2020-2021 Spring

EALC 24517/34517 Human Rights in China

(HIST 24516, HIST 34616)

This seminar explores the diverse range of human rights crises confronting China and Chinese people today. Co-taught by Teng Biao, an internationally recognized lawyer and advocate for human rights, and University of Chicago China historian Johanna Ransmeier, this course focuses upon demands for civil and political rights within China. Discussions will cover the Chinese Communist Party's monopoly on power, the mechanisms of the Chinese criminal justice system, and the exertion of state power and influence in places like Tibet, Hong Kong, Xinjiang, and Taiwan, as well as the impact of the People's Republic of China on international frameworks. We will discuss the changing role of activism and the expansion of state surveillance capacity. Students are encouraged to bring their own areas of interest to our conversations. Throughout the quarter we will periodically be joined by practitioners from across the broader human rights community.

J. Ransmeier
2020-2021 Spring

EALC 24616/34616 Osamu Tezuka's Phoenix Manga: Buddhism, Ethics, Science Fiction, and post-WWII Manga and Anime

(FNDL 24613, HIST 24613)

How can the Buddhist axiom "All Life is Sacred" describe a universe which contains the atrocities of WWII? Osamu Tezuka, creator of Astro Boy and father of modern Japanese animation, wrestled with this problem over decades in his science fiction epic Phoenix(Hi no Tori), celebrated as the philosophical masterpiece of modern manga. Through a close reading of Phoenix and related texts, this course explores the challenges genocide and other atrocities pose to traditional forms of ethics, and how we understand the human species and our role in nature. The course will also examine the flowering of manga after WWII, how manga authors bypassed censorship to help people understand the war and its causes, and the role manga and anime have played in Japan's global contributions to politics, science, medicine, technology, techno-utopianism, environmentalism, ethics, theories of war and peace, global popular culture, and contemporary Buddhism. Readings will be mainly manga, and the final paper will have a creative option including the possibility of creating graphic work.

A. Palmer
2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 24626/34626 Japanese Cultures of the Cold War: Literature, Film, Music

This course is an experiment in rethinking what has conventionally been studied and taught as "postwar Japanese culture" as instances of global Cold War culture. We will look at celebrated works of Japanese fiction, film and popular music from 1945 through 1990, but instead of considering them primarily in relation to the past events of World War Two, we will try to understand them in relation to the unfolding contemporary global situation of the Cold War. We will also look at English-language writing on Japan from during and after the Cold War period. Previous coursework on modern Japanese history or culture is helpful, but not required. All course readings will be in English.

2020-2021 Winter

EALC 24713/34713 Society and the Supernatural in Late Imperial and Modern China

(HIST 24712, HIST 34712, HREL 34712, RLST 24712)

Introductory studies of Chinese history and culture often ignore religion, treating Confucius’s alleged agnosticism as representative of mainstream culture. But ideas about supernatural entities—souls separated from bodies, ancestral spirits, demons, immortals, the vital energies of mountains and rivers, and many more—and practices aimed at managing those spirits were important elements in  pre-1949 life. Spirits testified in court cases, cured or caused illnesses, mediated disputes, changed the weather, and made the realm governable or ungovernable. After declining in the 1950s–1970s, various kinds of worship are immensely popular again today, though usually in altered forms. This course traces changes in the intersection of ideas about spirits and daily social practices from late imperial times forward, focusing on attempts to “standardize the gods,” resistance to such efforts, and the consequences for cohesion, or lack of cohesion, across classes, territory, ethnicity, and other differences.

2020-2021 Winter

EALC 24716/34716 Japanese Art in the Sinosphere

(ARTH 24706, ARTH 34706)

From the earliest centuries of the common era until the 1870s, Japanese writers, artists, and scholars considered themselves to be living in the Sinosphere: the realm of China’s cultural and political centrality. Starting with a consideration of Chinese material culture in the Tale of Genji, we will proceed to address topics such as the relation between Chinese and Japanese handscroll paintings, the spread of Chinese-style ink monochrome painting in Japan, the rise of the Kano school as official painters and Chinese-style painting experts, and the immense popularity of literati painting and calligraphy. Korean painting’s intersection with Chinese and Japanese art in the medieval and early modern periods will also factor into the discussion. We will evaluate the changing dynamics around political power and gender embodied in the Chinese/Japanese oppositional duality and reassess the prevailing narratives concerning how the Sinosphere faded from view in the Meiji era.

2020-2021 Winter

EALC 24821/34821 Modern Chinese Satirical Novel in History

(HIST 24811/34811)

This course takes the fictional genre of satire as a unique window on Chinese history. Placing novels and novellas from Republican China, the PRC, and Taiwan alongside excerpts from classic satirical novels from world literature, we will focus not only on the literary merits and themes of these diverse texts but also on their social, political, and historical contexts. What essential elements constitute satire, and how can we understand a historical moment better if we think with this form of literature? What does literature reveal and what does it deliberately or inadvertently obscure? We will consider the ways in which satire advances -- or declines to advance -- or advocate alternative realities (utopias/dystopias), the cultural critique offered by satire and its national and supra-national contexts.

J. Ransmeier
2020-2021 Autumn

JAPN 24900/34900 Pre-Modern Japanese: Kindai Bungo I

The course is a systematic introduction to pre-modern and early-modern texts written in classical Japanese (bungo or kogo), the standard written language in Japan up to the beginning of the twentieth century. We will learn and absorb the fundamentals of classical Japanese grammar and engage with some of the core grammatical problematics of the language. Throughout the course students will gain a firm foundation in how the language is constructed, increase their comprehension of the language’s vocabulary, and will familiarize themselves with original texts in prose and poetry alike, including narrative fiction (monogatari), anecdotes (setsuwa), essays (zuihitsu), and traditional Japanese poems (waka). The goal is to acquire a firm foundation in the classical language and to be able to read pre-modern texts with the help of a dictionary, for the purpose of academic research.

Prerequisites

JAPN 20300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.

2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 24950/34950 Fictions of Selfhood in Modern Japanese Literature

As Japanese leaders in the mid 19th century faced the threat of colonization at the hands of the Western powers, they launched a project to achieve “Civilization and Enlightenment,” quickly transforming Japan into a global power that possessed its own empire. In the process fiction became a site for both political engagement and retreat.  A civilized country, it was argued, was supposed to boast “literature” as one of its Fine Arts. This literature was charged with representing the inner life of its characters, doing so in a modern national language that was supposed to be a transparent medium of communication. Between the 1880s and the early 1900s, a new language, new literary techniques, and a new set of ideologies were constructed to produce the “self” in novels and short stories. As soon as these new practices were developed, however, they became the objects of parody and ironic deconstruction. Reading key literary texts from the 1880s through the 1930s, as well as recent scholarship, this course will re-trace this historical and literary unfolding, paying special attention to the relationship between language and subjectivity. All readings will be in English.

2020-2021 Spring

EALC 25811/35811 Foundations of Chinese Buddhism

(RLST 22501)

An introduction to Buddhism in China, examined through lenses of texts, thought, and art. We will explore the major currents of Chinese Buddhist practice with a focus on the premodern tradition through around the 13th century (with some attention to modern connections), giving special consideration to major textual and artistic monuments, such as translated scriptures, Chan literature, and the cave-shrines of Dunhuang.   

2020-2021 Winter

EALC 25900/35900 Warring States Unearthed Manuscripts new number in the 200/300

This course will provide an overview of Chinese unearthed documents, beginning with the oracle-bone inscriptions of the Shang dynasty and the bronze inscriptions of the Western Zhou dynasty, and then concluding with bamboo and silk manuscripts of the Warring States, Qin and Han dynasties. By reading selections from these materials, we will seek to gain a general sense of both how they were produced and used at the time and also how their modern study has evolved.

2020-2021 Spring

EALC 27014/37014 Voices from the Iron House: Lu Xun’s Works

(CMLT 27014, CMLT 37014, FUND 21907)

An exploration of the writings of Lu Xun (1881-1936), widely considered as the greatest Chinese writer of the past century. We will read short stories, essays, prose poetry and personal letters against the backdrop of the political and cultural upheavals of early 20th century China and in dialogue with important English-language scholarly works.

2020-2021 Spring

EALC 28202/38202 New Directions in the Study of Japanese Religion

(HREL 38202, RLST 28202)

The course examines the multiple religious traditions spread across the Japanese archipelago, their tenets, rituals, values, and their intimate ties to literature, politics, social structures and economy. The goal will be to arrive at a substantive understanding of Japanese religions and the state of the field of religious studies, and explore potential directions for future research. We will consider both the openness of Japanese religion to incorporate new ideas and its proclivity for relational and amalgamative theories and practices, and also cases of outright rejection of certain Sinitic and pan-Asian ideas. Accordingly, this course will focus not only on the religions of Buddhism, Shinto, and Confucianism, but also their interactions with other traditions such as Onmyōdō, Shugendō, and popular religion (minkan shūkyō).

Each week we will read a recent monograph and analyze the main arguments and its methodological contribution to the field of religious studies and Japanese religion. Students will be asked to reflect critically on the central arguments of the books, as well as their discussion of doctrine, practice and cultural trends examined in the readings. The topics that we will discuss each week are diverse and include: Esoteric Buddhism (mikkyō), original enlightenment thought (hongaku), religious readings of literature (narrative and poetry), visual culture in Pure Land Buddhism, Kuroda Toshio’s Marxist and political theory, State Shinto and nationalism, cross-cultural transmissions between Chinese Chan and Japanese Zen, mountain worship and maritime religiosity, and Japan’s imagination of South Asia. We will pay close attention to how scholars use various methodologies and theories in their examinations of religious phenomena, such as ritual theory, literary and critical theory, feminist and queer theory, among others. Over the course of the quarter, students will build their own methodological and theoretical toolkits and put them into practice by writing a research paper.

2020-2021 Winter

EALC 28218/38218 Buddhist Visual Cultures

(HREL 38218, RLST 28218)

Throughout the centuries, Buddhism has developed a unique and immensely diverse visual culture. Indeed, attention to the visual may well be one of the fundamental characteristics of this religious tradition, to the point that Buddhism in China was known as the “teachings of images” (xiang jiao). This course explores the rich world of Buddhist visual culture through a focus on some of its most representative aspects. We begin with a discussion of the Buddha’s absence and the need for representations in the Indian context. Next, we study forms of meditation and visualization in China and Japan, together with dream-making technologies and dreamscapes. Then, we move into the complex world of Buddhist material artifacts in East Asia (images, mandalas, temple architecture, and Buddhist fashioning of landscape). Toward the end of the course, we examine material that is rarely studied in terms of Buddhist visual culture, namely, maps and visions of the world (Indian, Chinese, and Japanese models), and the cultural components of display of Buddhist objects at temples and museums. The course concludes with theoretical considerations on the dichotomies of absence/presence and visible/invisible that seem to characterize much of Buddhist visual culture. Through an analysis and discussion of a wide set of readings, ranging from Buddhist meditation texts to studies of visualizations, dreams, icons, and the landscape, from practices of display to acts of iconoclastic destruction, this course aims at offering a wider conceptualization of visuality in Buddhism, not confined to consideration of art.

2020-2021 Spring

EALC 38400 Modern Chinese Literature: Communities, Media & Selves

In this in-depth introduction to modern Chinese literature we will combine close readings of texts with a survey of the ideas, media, and institutions that shaped literary practices from the 1900s to the early 1940s. We will discuss authors, literary circles and associations, journals and publishers, as well as notions of self, language, and community. In doing so, we will pursue the following questions: What is a “modern Chinese literary text,” and what are its relevant “contexts”? How to connect literary writing—per se a highly individualized and largely solitary activity—with the forms of sociality and the collaborative practices in which it is embedded? How did various communities and institutions affect, and how were they affected by, the writing and reading of literature? Our focus will be on the ways in which authors and groups redefined the functions of literature in times of upheaval, the transformations in language and media that shaped their efforts, and the ways in which they conceived of and sought to reach out to readers. Our explorations will be both historical and historiographical, and will touch on the main debates in modern Chinese literary studies today. All assigned readings are in English translation, but students who read Chinese are encouraged to read the original texts.

Prerequisites

Note(s): This course will be offered to graduate students only for this quarter.

2020-2021 Winter

EALC 40460 Polemic, Betrayal and Dung Beetles in the Pure Land: Zhili, Renyue and the Miaozongchao Controversies

(DVPR 40450, HREL 40450)

The Foshuo guanwuliangshoufojing shuji 佛說觀無量壽佛經疏妙宗鈔 (known for short as the Guanjingmiaozongchao or Miaozongchao) was written by the great Tiantai thinker Siming Zhili 四明智禮 (960-1028) in 1021. For the previous 20 years, Zhili had been the main spokesman and theoretician of the Shanjia (“Home Mountain”) faction in the heated doctrinal debates with the Shanwai (“Off Mountain”) faction of the Tiantai school, and this work brought those controversies to a new fever pitch, making the most radical of the Shanjia doctrinal claims aggressively and provocatively clear.  Among these positions, the Shanjia ideas of “the ultimate dung beetle” 究竟蛣and “all that exists is mind alone, but also matter alone” 唯心唯色 aroused perhaps the fiercest opposition, but the contentions concerning the nature and relations of the Three Bodies of the Buddha (trikaya) with respect to Amitabha Buddha in this subcommentary to a Pure Land sutra were also highly inflammatory, and a Shanwai attack soon followed. Zhili’s disciple Jingjue Renyue淨覺仁岳 (992-1064), his ablest and most ferocious attack dog during much of the previous 20 years of debate, quickly wrote a closely argued defense.   But soon thereafter, Renyue suddenly reversed his position, turning against many of the key Shanjia positions that he himself had so powerfully defended in years past, writing increasingly virulent polemics against his former teacher, thereby initiating the final phase of the Shanjia-Shanwai debate—now between Zhili and his former heir apparent. This class will be a close reading of the key texts in this debate: the Miaozongchao itself and Renyue’s defense and subsequent attack of that text. All readings will be in classical Chinese, reading proficiency in which is a prerequisite for this course. Some familiarity with Buddhist Chinese and theory is also highly recommended. Discussion will be in English. Prerequisites: Strong reading proficiency in Classical Chinese required. Previous knowledge of Buddhism and some experience with Buddhist Chinese is recommended.

Equivalent course(s): DVPR 40450, HREL 40450

B. Ziporyn
2020-2021 Spring

JAPN 20500/40500 Fourth-Year Modern Japanese I

(JAPN 40500)

This course is intended to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing, and listening ability to the advanced low level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes, reading assignments include academic theses, literary texts, and popular journalism. After each reading, students are encouraged to discuss the topic in class and are required to write their own thoughts on each reading along with a summary. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions each week.

Prerequisites

JAPN 20403/30300 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

JAPN 20600/40600 Fourth-Year Modern Japanese II

This course is intended to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing, and listening ability to the advanced low level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes, reading assignments include academic theses, literary texts, and popular journalism. After each reading, students are encouraged to discuss the topic in class and are required to write their own thoughts on each reading along with a summary. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions each week.

Prerequisites

JAPN 20500 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

JAPN 20700/40700 Fourth-Year Modern Japanese III

This course is intended to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing, and listening ability to the advanced low level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes, reading assignments include academic theses, literary texts, and popular journalism. After each reading, students are encouraged to discuss the topic in class and are required to write their own thoughts on each reading along with a summary.

Prerequisites

JAPN 20600 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions each week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

CHIN 40800 Advanced Readings in Literary Chinese I

(EALC 40800)

Selected readings in pre-modern Chinese literature from the first millennium B.C.E. to the end of the imperial period. The course covers important works in topics ranging from philosophy, history and religion to poetry, fiction and drama. Specific content varies by instructor.

Prerequisites

Course may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Undergraduate enrollment is encouraged. CHIN 21000, or placement, or consent of instructor.

2020-2021 Autumn

CHIN 40900 Advanced Readings in Literary Chinese II

Throughout this sequence, students read selections in pre-modern Chinese literature from the first millennium B.C.E. to the end of the imperial period. The course covers important works in topics ranging from philosophy, history and religion to poetry, fiction and drama. Each quarter's specific content varies by instructor. Specific content varies by instructor.

Prerequisites

Course may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Undergraduate enrollment is encouraged. CHIN 40800, or CHIN 21000, or placement, or consent of instructor. Note(s): Not offered every year; quarters vary.

2020-2021 Winter

CHIN 20509/40900 Readings in Literary Chinese I

This course involves advanced readings in classical Chinese with selections from philosophical and historical writings.

2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 41005 Early Chinese Texts and Sociological Research

The use of texts for sociological and cultural inquiry. This year the seminar addresses concepts of the body in ancient and medieval Chinese culture, with focus on the second century BCE manuscripts discovered in Laoguanshan Han tomb no. 3, in Chengdu, Sichuan.

2020-2021 Winter

KORE 41100 Understanding Contemporary Korean Society through Media

This content-based language course designed to meet the needs of high-advanced level students of Korean, including international/heritage language students who have studied in Korea up to the primary school levels. There are two main goals for the course. The first objective of the course is to foster speed, accuracy, and comprehension in advanced listening and reading of authentic contemporary texts as well as the refinement of writing skills in various styles. The second objective is for the students to acquire a deeper analytic knowledge of cultural and social issues in contemporary Korea. By examining various articles, TV shows, and films, we are going to discuss contemporary Korean culture, politics and society. The themes that will be dealt with in the class are “The Hell Chosŏn discourse and Korean youth culture” “Pain and Sympathy: South Korean Society after the Sewol Ferry Disaster” and “Korea as Multi-Ethnic Society.”

Prerequisites

Successful completion of 3rd year Korean or consent from instructor.

H. Park
2020-2021 Autumn

CHIN 20501/41100 Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I

Students must take a quality grade. No auditors permitted. This three-quarter sequence uses a textbook entitled Today’s World. Select Reading of Chinese Spotlight News. While introducing students to hot topics in today’s China through authentic material, this sequence aims in developing students’ skills in describing objects, narrating events, and discussing and defending opinion in both speaking and writing. Reading comprehension is also in the focus of this sequence. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

Prerequisites

CHIN 20403 or placement.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 41102 Reading Archival Documents from the People's Republic of China

(HIST 41102)

This hands-on reading and research course aims to give graduate students the linguistic skills needed to locate, read, and analyze archival documents from the People's Republic of China. We will begin by discussing the functions and structure of Chinese archives at the central, provincial, and county level. Next we will read and translate sample documents drawn from different archives. These may include police reports, personnel files, internal memos, minutes of meetings, etc. Our aim here is to understand the conventions of a highly standardized communication system - for example, how does a report or petition from an inferior to a superior office differ from a top-down directive or circular, or from a lateral communication between adminstrations of equal rank? We will also read "sub-archival" documents, i.e. texts that are of interest to the historian but did not make it into state archives, such as letters, diaries, contracts, and private notebooks. The texts we will read are selected to cast light on the everyday life of "ordinary" people in the Maoist period.  This course will be team-taught by me and historians of the PRC from other institutions, and will be open to selected students from outside the U of C. Non-Chicago students and teachers will participate via video conference. The course is meant for graduate students who are preparing for archival research in China or already working with archival documents. Advanced undergraduates who are doing archival research may enrol with the instructor's permission.

2020-2021 Autumn

KORE 41200 Fourth-Year Korean II

2020-2021 Winter

CHIN 20502/41200 Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II

This sequence introduces a range of influential literary works and scholarly essays on Chinese cultural and social issues from the 1920s to the 1990s. Students not only expand their vocabulary and knowledge of grammatical structures but also learn sophisticated speaking and writing skills through intensive readings and discussions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

Prerequisites

CHIN 41100 or placement.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

KORE 41300 Fourth-Year Korean III

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

CHIN 20503/41300 Fourth-Year Modern Chinese III

This sequence introduces a range of influential literary works and scholarly essays on Chinese cultural and social issues from the 1920s to the 1990s. Students not only expand their vocabulary and knowledge of grammatical structures but also learn sophisticated speaking and writing skills through intensive readings and discussions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

Prerequisites

CHIN 41200 or placement.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

EALC 41450 Peach Blossom Fan: Theater, History, and Politics

This seminar probes the interplay of history, politics, and theatricality in Kong Shangren's Peach Blossom Fan, his dramatic masterpiece of 1699, which brilliantly depicts the fall of the Ming dynasty in 1644-1645 on multiple social, cultural, and ritual fronts, from the pleasure quarters and the imperial court to the Confucian Temple and the battlefield.  Issues to be addressed include: the representation and reassessment of late Ming entertainment culture--courtesans, actors, storytellers, musicians, booksellers, painters; metatheatricality; memory and commemoration; props and material culture; the dissemination of news and (mis)information; the reenactment of the past on the stage, as we contextualize Peach Blossom Fan within the early Qing literary and theatrical world in which it was created and performed. We'll also examine the interplay of history, politics, and theatricality in the modern reception of the play by analyzing its modern and contemporary incarnations in spoken drama, feature film, and different operatic genres.

2020-2021 Winter

EALC 44450 Sound in Japanese Literature

This course engages with the various uses of sound in Japanese literary texts, ranging from the late Edo period through the contemporary era. We will also read recent sound-oriented approaches to literary and cultural studies in both Japan and Anglo-American criticism. Readings will be in both English and Japanese.

2020-2021 Spring

EALC 45400 Grad Sem: Western Zhou Bronze Inscriptions

After a brief introduction to Shang oracle-bone inscriptions, we will focus on Western Zhou bronze inscriptions. The choice of inscriptions to study will depend on the interests of the students in class.

Prerequisites

CHIN 21000 or consent.

2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 45401 Eastern Zhou Bronze Inscriptions

This course will provide an overview of Chinese unearthed documents of the Eastern Zhou dynasty, including both bronze and stone inscriptions and also bamboo and silk manuscripts. By reading selections from these materials, we will seek to gain a general sense of both how they were produced and used at the time and also how their modern study has evolved.

Prerequisites

Proficiency in Literary Chinese. This course is a continuation of EALC 45400, although 45400 is not a prerequisite of EALC 45401.

2020-2021 Winter

EALC 45406 Media, History, East Asia

This seminar serves as an introduction to theories of media and mediation in the context of scholarship on East Asia. “Media” has come to be a ubiquitous term in how we think not just about technologies of communication and dissemination, but about literature, music, film, digital art, and other forms of cultural production. We will look at how the concept has been taken up in recent scholarly work on China, Japan, and Korea, and raise questions about how this research draws on media theories from elsewhere; how it seeks to develop or recover locally inflected theories of media; and how we might distinguish between the two. Specific media covered include writing, the book, music, television, film, and digital platforms. A portion of the course will also be dedicated to thinking and learning about how to acquire and analyze materials from online sources using digital tools. The past and present intersection of media history with area studies concerns will thus be as much of a focus as the future this dialogue holds.

2020-2021 Winter

EALC 47111 Culture Fever: Chinese Literature in the 1980s

The Chinese 1980s are now remembered as a highly creative period in literature and arts, and as a time of diverse political aspirations that culminated in the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. Many debates and experiments throughout the decade revolved around the notion of “culture.” What did this term mean in 1980s China, why was it considered important, and how to situate its meanings historically, both in relation to the Mao Era and to the changes that came after 1989? These are some of the questions we will address in this course, which will examine a variety of texts including poetry, fiction, interviews, diaries, and documentaries from and about the cultures of an exciting time. Texts will be in Chinese and in English.

2020-2021 Spring

EALC 28010/48010 Archaeology of Anyang: Bronzes, Inscriptions, World Heritage

(ANTH 26765, ANTH 36765)

Anyang is one of the most important archaeological sites in China. The discoveries of inscribed oracle bones, the royal cemetery, clusters of palatial structures, and industrial-scale craft production precincts have all established that the site was indeed the last capital of the Shang dynasty recorded in traditional historiography. With almost continuous excavations since the late 1920s, work at Anyang has in many ways shaped and defined Chinese archaeology and the study of Early Bronze Age China. This course intends to examine the history of research, important archaeological finds, and the role of Anyang studies in the field of Chinese archaeology. While the emphasis is on archaeological finds and the related research, this course will also attempt to define Anyang in the modern social and cultural contexts in terms of world heritage, national and local identity, and the looting and illegal trade of antiquities.

Prerequisites

Note(s): Open to undergraduates with consent of instructor.

2020-2021 Winter

EALC 28015/48015 Archaeology of Bronze Age China

(ANTH 26760, ANTH 36760)

“Bronze Age” in China conventionally refers to the time period from ca. 2000 to about 500 BC, during which bronze, an alloy of copper and other metals such as tin and lead, was the predominant medium used by the society, or to be more precise, the elite classes of the society. Bronze objects, in the forms of vessels, weapons, and musical instruments, were reserved for the upper ruling class of the society and were used mostly as paraphernalia during rituals and feasting. “Bronze Age” in China also indicates the emergence and eventual maturation of states with their bureaucratic systems, the presence of urban centers, a sophisticated writing system, and advanced craft producing industries, especially metal production.

This course surveys the important archaeological finds of Bronze Age China, and the theoretical issues such as state formation, craft production, writing, bureaucratic systems, urbanization, warfare, and inter-regional interaction, etc.  It emphasizes a multi-disciplinary approach with readings and examples from anthropology, archaeology, art history, and epigraphy. This course will also visit the Smart Museum, the Field Museum, and the Art Institute of Chicago to take advantage of the local collections of ancient Chinese arts and archaeology.

2020-2021 Spring

EALC 49630 Madhyamaka in India and China

This seminar will consider exemplary texts from the Madhyamaka school(s) of Buddhist philosophy, particularly focusing on notable points of divergence and/or concord between the Indian schools with which the tradition originated, and the various Chinese schools that reflect China's distinctive appropriation of the tradition. Brook Ziporyn and Dan Arnold

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

CHIN 20602/51200 Fifth-Year Modern Chinese II

This sequence is designed to prepare students for academic research and activities in a Chinese language environment. Modern classic essays, documentary film and TV broadcasts will be included among the teaching materials. Students will learn not only general listening, speaking, and reading skills but also academic writing. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week. Students can arrange two additional one-on-one sessions to prepare for assigned language projects.

Prerequisites

CHIN 20601 or placement. Both undergrad and grads can take this course.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

CHIN 20603/51300 Fifth-Year Modern Chinese III

This sequence is designed to prepare students for academic research and activities in a Chinese language environment. Modern classic essays, documentary film and TV broadcasts will be included among the teaching materials. Students will learn not only general listening, speaking, and reading skills but also academic writing. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week. Students can arrange two additional one-on-one sessions to prepare for assigned language projects.

Prerequisites

20602 or placement. Both undergrad and grads can take this course.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

EALC 58011 Archaeology of Craft Production: Theories and Case Studies

(ANTH 58011)

The course will review anthropological literature and case studies of craft production and craft specialization in ancient civilizations. It also takes a multi-disciplinary approach by adopting perspectives developed in history and art history. Topics discussed in the course include organization of production, craft production and the elite, chaîne opératoire, status and identity of artisans, and political economy and craft production. Students are expected to become familiar with prevalent theoretical discussions and are encouraged to apply, adopt, or revise them in order to analyze examples of craft production of their own choice.

Open to upper division undergrads with permission from instructor.

2020-2021 Spring

EALC 59700 Thesis Research

For course description contact East Asian Languages.

Prerequisites

Note(s): ,Consent required.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

EALC 59700 Thesis Research

For course description contact East Asian Languages.

 

Prerequisites

Note(s): Consent required.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

EALC 59700 Thesis Research

For course description contact East Asian Languages.

Prerequisites

Note(s): Consent required.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 60000 Reading Course

Independent reading course.

 

Prerequisites

Note(s): Consent required.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

EALC 60000 Reading Course: Specific Topic in EALC

Independent reading course.

Prerequisites

Note(s): Consent required.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

EALC 60000 Reading Course

Independent reading course.

Prerequisites

Note(s): Consent required.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 65000 Directed Translation

Fulfills translation requirement for EALC graduate students. Must be arranged with individual faculty member. Register by section with EALC faculty.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 65000 Directed Translation

Fulfills translation requirement for EALC graduate students. Must be arranged with individual faculty member. Register by section with EALC faculty.

Staff
2020-2021 Winter

EALC 65000 Directed Translation

Fulfills translation requirement for EALC graduate students. Must be arranged with individual faculty member. Register by section with EALC faculty.

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

EALC 65601 Extraordinary Ordinary: Reading and Writing Grassroots and Microhistory

(HIST 65601, SALC 65601)

This graduate seminar confronts the challenges of writing history from the bottom up. Although the syllabus engages heavily with the debates launched by the Subaltern Studies collective, our investigation will not be bounded by any specific regional or temporal focus. Students should feel free to experiment beyond their usual comfort zone in both terms of writing style and or topic. We will consider the theoretical legacies and challenges of postcolonial history writing, the linguistic turn, subaltern studies, and microhistory. The course pays special attention to different ways to grapple with sources and the construction of diverse archives.

J. Ransmeier
2020-2021 Winter

EALC 67804 Media Ecology

(CMST 67804)

The seminar aims to develop an ecological understanding of media (infrastructures, platforms, forms). The focus will be on the conceptual shift from dialectics to energetics (as well as the relation between them) that runs through German media theory, philosophies of technology, and new materialisms. The thematic focus for Fall 2020 will be on oceans and waterways.

T. Lamarre
2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 70000 Advanced Residence

Staff
2020-2021 Spring

EALC 70000 Advanced Residence

For course description contact East Asian Languages.

Staff
2020-2021 Autumn

EALC 70000 Advanced Residence

Staff
2020-2021 Winter